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Employee FAQs

What should I do with my life?
What are you worth?
Should I go solo?
What are your career prospects for 2002?
How can I find work as a virtual assistant?
How can I survive a home business and the holidays?
How do I market myself?
What's life like as an information worker?
Dotcommers look to future
What's the outlook for freelancers in 2002?
How to set up a web design business without breaking the bank
Top 10 survival tips
Where can I meet other Networkers?
Workers free at last
What are some tips for finding online content work?
What's the outlook for web developers?
Freelance rates
What are the going rates for writers?
Do great print writers make great web writers?
Is there enough work out there for everyone?
How do I know if I'm ready to 'get out of job jail'?
How can I avoid being exploited as a writer?
Just who is a professional writer anyway?
How can I break into e-business writing?
How can I become more productive as an e-worker?
Quick tip for power networking
How do I negotiate my rates as a freelancer?
Where are the jobs for the girls?
How can I escape the job world and create the life I really want?
What are some pitfalls for independent professionals?
Do I need technical skills or HTML to work in the IT&T industry?
Which skills are in greatest demand?
How can I increase my Net worth as an online professional?
How do I present an online resume?
How can I reposition myself as an e-worker?
Where can I find a contract for online content writing?
How can I avoid burnout as an independent professional?
What's it like to work as a freelance online writer?
Do I need writing experience?
What does it take to be a successful online columnist?
Can you give me any tips on networking?
Can two independent professionals live and work together without going mad
How much do others make online?
How can I transfer my writing talent to the web?
What personal qualities do I need to succeed in the online content business?
What other content skills are in demand besides writing?
Where can I get free forms (eg contracts, fee-estimating worksheets)?
How do editors find and manage writers?
How much should I charge as a content professional?
What's the best way to manage a web development team?
Can you give me some tips for finding work?
Do I have to network to find Net work?

What should I do with my life?

With a new year under way and the world in a whirl, some people are inevitably asking the big question, "What should I do with my life?"

Writer Po Bronson has spent the past two years listening to the life stories of more than 900 people who have dared to be honest with themselves and found the real meaning of success.

"The current difficult climate serves as a form of reckoning. The tougher the times, the more clarity you gain about the difference between what really matters and what you only pretend to care about. The funny thing is that most people have good instincts about where they belong but make poor choices and waste productive years on the wrong work."

Sounds to me like a recipe for good online content as well as the good life. Read on.

http://www.fastcompany.com/online/66/mylife.html

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What are you worth?

Did you know the recommended minimum for freelance and casual writers in Australia is $169 an hour?

Few can command that rate, at least not in print, but it gives you a starting point for negotiations. Generally, the longer the project, the more your drop the rate.

Independent contractors in ICT in Australia earn $60 to $100 an hour, with two-thirds working as consultants, project managers or programmer/analysts -
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2002/09/21/1032055002735.html

2002 National Freelance Rates -
http://www.alliance.org.au/rights/freelance.pdf

Quoting and charge rate calculators -
http://www.businesspublications.com.au/calculators.html

US rates for business writing -
http://www.writersmarket.com/content/charge.asp

How to set your hourly rate -
http://content.ninemsn.monster.com.au/temps/temp020404_010/

more tips on setting your rates -
http://www.brizcomm.com.au/freetips/tips.asp?id=3

employee and employer FAQs -
http://www.brizcomm.com.au/contentjobs/faqs.asp?id=21

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Should I go solo?

Holidays give you time out to reassess your life and career direction.

If you're toying with the idea of going solo, first see how you answer these eight questions -

http://www.msmoney.com/ework/exchange/articles/are_you_cut_out_for_independence.htm

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What are your career prospects for 2002?

Wanna know your career prospects for 2002?

According to the experts, growth in IT employment and spending this year could start as early as March.

Recruitment consultants advise job seekers to build on their skills with short courses and exposure to new technology while developing soft skills such as team work and communication -

http://www.webpronewsau.com/resources/r2.html

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How can I find work as a virtual assistant?

If you'd like to work online from home, think about becoming a virtual assistant -

http://www.thestandard.com.au/idg2.nsf/a/0004BD4A?OpenDocument&n=e&c=SD

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How can I survive a home business and the holidays?

When you work from home, it can be tricky to take a break. Pick up a few tips on surviving a home business and the holidays at -

http://www.eureka-java-gold.com/Ezines/article.cfm?articleid=275

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How do I market myself?

Marketing yourself is an extra challenge for independent info professionals. According to freelancer Brian S. Konradt, "marketing is probably the most ignored and neglected function of operating a profitable commercial copywriting business". For tips, read "A Marketing Checklist for Freelancers and Consultants" -

http://www.writeread.com/writeronline/konradt-11-30-01.htm

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What's life like as an information worker?

Information is the hot currency in the new economy but being an information worker is tougher than some might think.

For starters, you're dealing with constant change so live under the constant threat of information overload. Keeping on keeping up is a full-time job, and doesn't generate direct income.

Content consultant Gerry McGovern's shares a "Day in the life of an information worker" with a generous dash of Irish humour -

http://www.gerrymcgovern.com/nt/2001/nt_2001_11_26_hunter.htm

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Dotcommers look to future

It's been a tough year for dotcoms but things can only get better.

I, for one, have no intention of abandoning life online and the chance to be part of something new, exciting and, hopefully, valuable.

Thousands of other dotcommers are willing to ride the wave, even if they're dumped at the end.

Why? Perhaps we've adopted the "life-is-short" mantra since the September 11 terrorist attacks in the US. Maybe we're committed to a vision or want to escape the corporate cubicle. Could it be we're just blind optimists?

Two articles in Business Week Online explain dotcommers' reasons for hope and what we can expect in the Net's next era -

http://www.businessweek.com/technology/tc_special/dotcom.htm

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What's the outlook for freelancers in 2002?

Despite the economic slowdown in the second half of 2001, creative recruiter Aquent reports encouraging spikes in demand for creative freelancers in Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne and Auckland.

Asia-Pacific CEO Greg Savage says advertising agencies have responded to a fall-off in their clients' needs by cutting permanent headcount.

"Corporate users of creative talent are also running lean," Greg says. "In many cases when projects do emerge, businesses lack the in-house talent to service the work so they turn to freelancers as a solution."

Demand for specialist freelancers in the third quarter increased by -
5% - in web and multimedia
35% - in print production
45% - in print design

Aquent's research shows that while pay rates have levelled off, and maybe even fallen in the past two quarters, the long-term trend is upwards.

"We are positioning our business for an upswing in demand in early 2002...business always moves in cycles."

http://www.aquent.com/

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How to set up a web design business without breaking the bank

Seems every second person you meet wants to set up their own web design business -

http://wdvl.internet.com/Internet/Web/Jobs/Business/

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Top 10 survival tips

The word is that the industry downturn is showing faint signs of stabilising but many freelancers are still doing it tough.

To ride out the slump, read eWork Exchange's top 10 survival tips for freelance writers (and other eWorkers):

http://www.ework.com/content_article.cfm?article_id=152

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Where can I meet other Networkers?

Workshop participants often ask for a list of email addresses of fellow workshopees.

While I can't give out email addresses, anyone interested in sharing ideas, experiences and tips in web content, e-newsletters or other Net-related matters is welcome to use the forum and chat room on http://www.brizcomm.com.au (see blue panel on right of each page).

Think of brizcomm as your virtual meeting place. When you work
from home, it's healthy to mingle from time to time.

By the way, Inscriptions has a helpful article and resources for remote workers on "Networking on the Net" by Teri Brownand Linda Sherwood (new Inscriptions subscriptions cost $US5 a year):

http://www.inscriptionsmagazine.com/071701a.html

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Workers free at last

The word "independence" takes on new meaning in this brave new
21st century world.

According to Daniel Pink, who wrote "Free Agent Nation", about
33 million Americans have quit their jobs to work on their own.

Pink says these "free agents" constitute a cultural phenomenon and
are redefining the very definition of work and how we go about it.

"The lifespan of companies is shrinking," he says. "Today, all of us
can expect to outlive any company or organisation we work for."

Pink says workers want freedom, authenticity, greater accountability
and self-defined success.

Read the full article, "Free at last . . . Free at last?" at:

http://www.content-exchange.com/cx/html/newsletter/3-3/sp3-3.htm

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What are some tips for finding online content work?

Content-Exchange owner guru Steve Outing has a few helpful tips for
freelancers seeking online content work.

Suggestions include:
* diversify
* avoid pureplay dot.coms
* choose clients carefully
* write for cross-media
* focus on niche markets
* look to the corporate web
* don't be short-sighted.

Couldn't have put it better myself, Steve.

Remember, what goes down must come up. Be ready for the demand by spending your quiet time sharpening your skills - and your edge.

http://www.content-exchange.com/cx/html/newsletter/2-25/car2-25.5.htm

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What's the outlook for web developers?

If you're on the technical side of web development, see your future:

http://www.infoworld.com/articles/ca/xml/01/05/07/010507cajob.xml

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Freelance rates

Australia's Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance has posted its new rates for freelancers for 2001.

The hourly rate has risen to $124 and a day is worth $617 (hint: you'll get closer to these rates online than in print). See the "My Work" section for freelancers at http://www.alliance.org.au/

And don't forget to create your profile in Content Jobs at brizcomm.

Speaking of money, Content-Exchange founder Steve Outing has a solid round-up of potential online revenue streams:

209.11.43.220/editorandpublisher/features_columns/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1004988

You should also post your free professional profile at Steve's site:
http://www.content-exchange.com

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What are the going rates for writers?

So, you finally want to make some real money from your writing? Find out the going rates, among other things, here:

http://www.writersmarket.com/content/charge.asp

or here (under My Work, Freelance):

http://www.alliance.org.au/

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Do great print writers make great web writers?

You can't expect to become a web writer by reading a book any more than you can learn to drive a car by reading the owner's manual.

Without a basic understanding of web site structure and navigation, and a passion for the new medium, you might as well just shovel your print brochures online.

For that very reason, my web content workshops include more than just writing techniques.

Clickz columnist Kathy Henning explains why writing for the web is harder than writing for print and why world-class print writers don't necessarily make world-class web writers:

http://www.clickz.com/design/onl_edit/article.php/833481

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Is there enough work out there for everyone?

Journalists no longer have a mortgage on freedom of speech.

That's why I share my knowledge of new and old media with professional and non-professional writers alike.

With the overwhelming amount of information available, demand for
professional "filters" and online content creators can only grow.

In a perfect world, the web development team would include a technical expert, a graphic designer, a content creator/editor, a PR/marketer, a business strategist and project manager (to pull the lot together - or apart, at times).

In the real world, many of us must multi-task.

I don't have a conflict of interest with that. There's enough work out there for us all to learn and share from each other.

Anyone can write but not everyone leaves his or her readers content.

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How do I know if I'm ready to 'get out of job jail'?

If you feel as though you're living for your annual vacation, could be you need to change course.

Take Valerie Young's simple 10-step quiz to find out if you're ready then take the 10 steps to "get out of job jail".

http://www.changingcourse.com/quiz.htm

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How can I avoid being exploited as a writer?

If you're just starting out and want to drum up some online content work, think about working for a non-profit group to gain experience.

Another idea is to find a book or piece of art you admire, write to the creator and offer to develop a site for a modest fee.

(Just don't do what I did and finance the project out of your own pocket - kind of defeats the purpose when you're struggling yourself.)

If you're working for a commercial organisation, make sure you're paid properly.

Too many professional writers suffer from the "starving artist" mentality, almost apologising to clients for having to charge for their work.

Don't be exploited. Once you have the experience and a stack of quality examples, stand by the industry's minimum recommended rates - see http://www.alliance.org.au

If you don't, you're not only lowering your own standards but damaging the chances of other freelancers to be paid their dues.

If more writers had the guts to stand by their profession, we wouldn't have to spend so much time educating people that it takes more than a word-processing program to create great content.

Writing simply is difficult - just look at the tangled gobbledegook online.

You wouldn't expect your plumber to work for free so why should you?

Quote your rates proudly and turn down the job if the client does not value your worth.

There's plenty more fish in the Net.

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Just who is a professional writer anyway?

The Internet has enabled anyone to become a publisher.

You don't need Rupert to hire you to share your written words, ideas and opinions with many people.

But the fact you can publish does not automatically make you a professional writer - or journalist.

The issue of who is a journalist online is raising spirited debate on more than a few discussion boards.

Should web site publishers abide by the journalistic code of ethics (eg don't reveal sources, don't let financial incentives affect your objectivity)?

Are web site publishers entitled to free sample copies of software, books, CDs and other reviewers' "perks".

The status of journalists has generally hovered around the level of used-car salesmen but, until the Net, they (we) were the staple providers of information.

Now, the line is blurred and PR and marketing professionals need to write their own definition of "media".

While you could use the number of visits to a site as a measure of legitimacy, bear in mind that porn sites draw the most traffic.

Food for thought.

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How can I break into e-business writing?

With more than 50,000 new Net companies entering the global village every week, writers can tap into a veritable goldmine.

Many of these sites need new fresh content and the Internet means you don't even have to be in the same country as the site owner.

"Going Global" columnist Mike Sedge shows you how to break into the e-business writing market with his seven-step plan:

http://www.novalearn.com/wol/Sedge.htm

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How can I become more productive as an e-worker?

When you can't take a holiday, take a class (see brizcomm's Workshops calendar for details of my next web content workshop).

As Net writer Sacha Cohen says in "Power Networking", "tapping into creative and physical activities can make you more productive as an eWorker and provide you with additional networking opportunities".

http://www.ework.com/content_article.cfm?article_id=42&epin=1492

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Quick tip for power networking

The simple tips are often the best. This one's courtesy of Ilise Benun, author of "Self Promotion Online":

"When you go to a networking event or conference, put your web address on your name tag, along with your name. It will be a conversation starter and plant a little seed for someone to visit your web site."

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How do I negotiate my rates as a freelancer?

"The 'free' in freelancing means independent - it shouldn't dictate
the price of your labour."

Wise words from Hillel Kutler in his eWork Exchange article tackling one of the most difficult parts of working as an independent professional:

http://www.ework.com/content_article.cfm?article_id=101&epin=1453

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Where are the jobs for the girls?

If you had any doubts about where the jobs will be in the next few years, look to the numbers.

A Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu study in The Australian newspaper this week indicates Australia's skills shortage in IT&T is "30,000 people this year - rising to 180,000 by 2004".

That's a solid-gold career path, anyway you look at it.

To meet the skills shortage and keep the balance, more people - particularly women - need to study IT&T.

Unfortunately the industry has an image problem, perceived by too many girls as boring and nerdy or macho and violent.

Not so, and Brisbane-based group Women in Information Technology
aims to prove it.

To learn more, visit WIT's site at http://www.wit.org.au

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How can I escape the job world and create the life I really want?

"The Buddhists call it 'right livelihood'. Others have referred to it as living the 'good life' - not in the sense of financial riches but in doing what you want to do and living where you want to live.

You know you are living the good life, says career counsellor and author Barbara Sher, when 'you get up in the morning and can't wait to start all over again'.

"For some, this means going for a total career change - from accountant to photographer, social worker to freelance writer, marketing manager to master gardener. For these people, the good life is when your passion also pays your way ..."

That's the start of Valerie Young's multipart article series, "10 Steps to Escape the Job World and Create the Life You Really Want".

Do yourself a giant favour and read the rest at:

http://www.changingcourse.com/steps.htm

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What are some pitfalls for independent professionals?

As an independent professional, you face a different set of challenges from your cubicle-bound colleagues.

Discover the top 10 mistakes you should avoid as an e-worker with the help of this article:

http://www.ework.com/contentEditorial10Mistakes.cfm?epin=1306

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Do I need technical skills or HTML to work in the IT&T industry?

For the year 2000, unemployment for knowledge workers will be below 1 per cent, according to Goldman Sachs through Forrester.

High school seniors considering their options for next year would do
well to remember that figure.

The fields of information technology and telecommunications are no longer just for "geeks".

More women, particularly, are entering these domains and loving the flexibility, challenges and rewards that come with professional independence.

You don't need to be a maths whiz (that would count me out), computer junkie or game head to enter and succeed in this industry.

The variety of skills needed in IT&T today span business to marketing, design to wordsmithing. In fact, nearly every industry today touches IT&T in some way.

The opportunities are open to everyone, not only the young.

See http://www.ignite.net.au for inspiration and to find out where to
acquire new skills or refresh old ones.

Don't forget brizcomm's workshops for starters

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Which skills are in greatest demand?

If you want to join the eWork revolution but don't know which field
to plough, read this article from eWork Exchange.

The possibilities span programming to project management and include
useful links for more information:

http://www.ework.com/contentEditorialHottestSkills.cfm?epin=1327

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How can I increase my Net worth as an online professional?

http://webreview.com/pub/2000/07/21/feature/index01.html?wwwrrr_20000721.txt

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How do I present an online resume?

Few web writers can claim to be veterans in the new medium.

We're all newbies compared with the long history of dead-tree media.

How do you get online experience if you don't have any?

I've long advocated for content wannabes to have a crack at building
their own sites to show they at least understand the medium.

You don't need anything flash (or Flash). Keep it simple or, better
still, do a contra deal with a graphic designer or programmer.

The experience of planning and preparing your site will give you
valuable insight into the limitations (and possibilities) of the wonderful World Wide Web.

Veteran interactive-writing teacher Crawford Kilian offers a few suggestions to help you present an online resume that will stand out
among the growing mottled pack of would-be content professionals.

While creating your personal masterpiece, remember his wise words:

"In this medium, we learn more from our mistakes than our successes."

http://www.content-exchange.com/cx/html/newsletter/2-4/ck2-4.htm

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How can I reposition myself as an e-worker?

Mature professionals considering a move to professional independence
will want to read this article from eWork Exchange.

"The good news is that we are living in an era of a 'talent-driven economy'. If you have the talent, half your battle is won."

http://www.ework.com/contentEditorialReposition.cfm?epin=1118

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Where can I find a contract for online content writing?

The Writers Guild of America (West) has posted a new contract for
online content writers to its site.

The contract covers writers who work on made-for-Internet audio-visual programming, including live action and animation.

Download the contract at: http://www.wga.org

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How can I avoid burnout as an independent professional?

If you plan to get away from it all, read eWork Exchange's tips on how to avoid post-holiday burnout:
http://www.ework.com/contentEditorialVacation.cfm?epin=1261

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What's it like to work as a freelance online writer?

Gain insight into the life of a freelance online writer through a series of articles by About.com guide Kimberly Hill.

http://freelancewrite.about.com/careers/freelancewrite/library/weekly/aa072000.htm
http://freelancewrite.about.com/library/weekly/aa063000.htm

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Do I need writing experience?

Although it helps to have a background as a writer to work in online content, it's not essential, as this article shows.

http://freelancewrite.about.com/library/weekly/aa063000.htm

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What does it take to be a successful online columnist?

http://www.content-exchange.com/cx/html/newsletter/2-2/tt2-2.5.htm

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Can you give me any tips on networking?

If you want to work in the Net industry, you must network.

You'll not only ward off the loneliness that can come with working
for yourself but you'll make valuable new contacts.

Pick up a few tips and tricks in this article from ework.com:

http://www.ework.com/contentEditorialPowerNetworking.cfm?epin=1106

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Can two independent professionals live and work together without going mad

Freelance writer Rob Einaudi reckons it can be done, with a little ingenuity and flexibility.

Read his advice for cohabiting eworkers at:
http://www.ework.com/contentEditorial2eworkers.cfm?epin=1109

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How much do others make online?

A survey by Content Exchange found that the rate of pay for some online freelancers was not great but it sure beat print.

The online survey of 270 freelancers also found that most writers were gaining income by moving to online writing.

If you're a wannabe cyber scribe, don't miss this article at:
http://www.content-exchange.com/cx/html/newsletter/2-4/sur2-4.5.htm

Sharpen your skills and get out there. There's no shortage of work around town, or around the globe for that matter, for web-savvy writers.

The papers rarely list content jobs, or the positions are disguised with ridiculous techie names. Word of mouth, email and writing or content-related sites (such as www.content-exchange.com) are still your best sources.

Check the Salary Zone to see your potential.
http://www.zdnet.com/ebusiness/filters/salaryzone/welcome

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How can I transfer my writing talent to the web?

http://www.office.com/global/0,,63-17809,FF.html

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What personal qualities do I need to succeed in the online content business?

Discover the personal qualities you'll need to survive in this booming industry with online content guru Amy Gahran's guide.

Anyone considering hiring a content pro should also read the article:

http://contentious.com/articles/V3/3-1/feature3-1a.html

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What other content skills are in demand besides writing?

The online content industry offers many more opportunities than just
straight content writing for web sites.

Content guru Amy Gahran offers a few ideas for pumping the creative
juices in the fields of sound, video, photography, illustration, animation, interactive applications and discussion moderating.

http://www.content-exchange.com/cx/html/newsletter/1-28/tt1-28.5.htm

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Where can I get free forms (eg contracts, fee-estimating worksheets)?

Creative freelancers whether designer, illustrator or copywriter
might appreciate the free forms at the Creative Business site.

Freebies include a fee-estimating worksheet, work-for-hire agreement,
creative review checklist, press release, rationales for hiring professionals and presentation tips.

The forms are in Adobe Acrobat's PDF format (a link to download the free Acrobat Reader is provided).

http://www.creativebusiness.com/on-line.html

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How do editors find and manage writers?

http://www.webreview.com/2000/04_21/webauthors/04_21_00_2.shtml
(check the sidebar for links to useful resources)

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How much should I charge as a content professional?

Congratulations, you've found a paying gig. Now how do you figure out what to charge?

If you're writing, editing, proofreading or project managing content for web, CD-ROM, zines or email - start with the approved minimum
rate as recommended by the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance
(MEAA) and the Queensland Writers Centre (QWC).

The 2001 recommended minimum for freelance writers was $124 an hour
or $772 a day. Those rates are gross (ie before tax).

If you prefer, you can charge per word but that's not a smart strategy online where you should write half as much as you would for print.

A flat project fee might suit some jobs better than others but make sure you allow for the "extras" (eg home office costs such as Net, phone and fax, travel time and costs, time for meetings and revisions, brainstorming, research, print-outs, postage, couriers).

As with any skill, your fee is relative to your talent and experience.
If you've not structured or written web content, you would not expect
top rates straight up - even with extensive print experience - unless you have specific expertise on a subject.

This is a new medium and the skills required are equally new.

Traps abound, particularly if you're working sight unseen for an unknown online publisher.

Be sure to cover yourself with a written agreement specifying terms and respective responsibilities, deadlines, copyright, and payment (and/or stock options which may or may not be worth a cracker).

Traditional "dead-tree" publishers have been ripping off writers for years with below-worth rates.

The Internet spells the end of exploitation of wordsmiths as writers around the globe spurn crony-ridden print publications for more creatively and financially rewarding online opportunities.

If you don't believe me, read content guru Steve Outing's excellent three-part article on the topic:
http://www.content-exchange.com/cx/html/newsletter/1-27/tt1-27.htm

or web-writing author Crawford Kilian's tips for hired web writers:
http://www.content-exchange.com/cx/html/newsletter/1-27/ck1-27.htm

Also read Debra Jason's superb primer on setting your freelance fees:
http://www.writedirection.com/rprt300e.htm

And don't miss these tips for freelancers:
http://www.writersdigest.com/tips/charge.htm

Related links:

Freelance Editorial Association Fee and Scheduling Guidelines (*US)
http://www.tiac.net/users/freelanc/fees.html

Media Entertainment Arts Alliance (recommended rates for photographers, artists, broadcasters, book editors, proofreaders and PR consultants - see My Work)
http://www.alliance.org.au

The National Writers Union survey on freelance and contract writers' rates:
http://www.nwu.org/hotline/hotsurv.htm

Queensland Writers Centre
http://www.qwc.asn.au

Australian Society of Authors
http://www.asauthors.org

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What's the best way to manage a web development team?

Managing a web development team is a challenge, no doubt about it.

No wonder really when you consider the differences between the key players high-tech programmers, visually creative designers and word-miser content writers.

Read all about it at WebReview.com, "cross-training for web teams" (April 5):
http://www.webreview.com/2000/06_09/developers/06_09_00_2c.shtml

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Can you give me some tips for finding work?

If you're serious about working on the Net, you need your own site to promote your talents and services.

A would-be content professional without a web site is like an artist without a portfolio.

It doesn't have to be flash (or Flash). Keep it simple, perhaps do a contra deal with a savvy designer (words for graphics).

For tips, read this excellent primer from content guru Amy Gahran:

http://www.content-exchange.com/cx/html/newsletter/1-6/tt1-6.htm

Don't forget to create a profile at Content Exchange while you're there - I've had work offers through it and know former workshop participants who are making good dollars.

If you're seeking work in Australasia, post your profile at http://www.brizcomm.com.au

Use the same profile on http://www.monsterboard.com.au and http://www.careerone.com.au, both of which have free agents that will scour the web for jobs matching your requirements and email them to you.

Add yourself to the Australian web developers' directory at http://web-developers.com

Join the Queensland Writers Centre (they have an employment referral service) at http://www.qwc.asn.au

Email web development companies with a brief (repeat brief) outline
of your services with a link to your own professional site.

Most of the work though can be found online itself. Go to the WRITERS
section of Surf Club at http://www.brizcomm.com.au and sign up for a few
of the job newsletters (eg Inscriptions, Writers Markets, Writer Online).

You'll find other job sites at: http://webreference.com/internet/jobs

Other than that, keep your eye on the papers - for Brisbane readers, particularly watch Tuesday's technology liftouts in The Australian and The Courier-Mail, and Saturday career/employment liftouts.

Don't wait for work to find you – go out and grab it.

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Do I have to network to find Net work?

Web work, web work, where for art thou, web work?

If I had a dollar for every time I've been asked for leads to web content work, I'd be on my luxury yacht already.

The web's been good to me so I'm happy to help others find contentment (no pun intended).

This is the year of content, even if some of the web development cowboys out there don't know it yet. In fact, I just read that writing copy is one of the top 10 emerging professions for the new century.

Site owners and developers are waking up to the fact that they need more than great graphics and "cool" effects to keep readers returning.

Clear, concise, user-centric information is where it's at and that's where the content manager comes in.

To use a fishy analogy, the content manager/creator/writer/producer is the person you get to hook, scale, gut and fillet your information ready for the chef (web developer/designer) and waiter (marketer) to serve up on a garnished platter.

Web site development is a team process, no bones about it.

Each member of the team must respect the specialist skills of the other members if the project is to succeed.

The key to finding content work (ie writing and structuring) is largely a matter of educating clients and the industry about the vital role of content - ie convince them that they need you.

To work on the Net, network - the more people you meet, the greater your chances of finding work.

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Bobby Approved (v 3.2) Unusual Corporate Gifts other than a Gift Basket

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